Prescott, Cowboys top 'Skins for 10th straight win

(The Sports Xchange) - Despite picking up a 10th straight win Thursday against the Washington Redskins, the Dallas Cowboys did not force a turnover for the third straight game.

While forcing turnovers is always a recipe for success in the NFL, the Cowboys found the weapon to compensate for it.

The weapon is rookie quarterback Dak Prescott.

Behind Prescott's 17 completions for 195 yards, his scoring run of six years and a touchdown pass to Terrence Williams, Dallas solidified its lead in the NFC East with a 31-26 over Washington.

Prescott's solid all-around performance improved the Cowboys to a franchise and NFL-best 10-1. His latest showing also extended Dallas' lead over the New York Giants to 2 1/2 games.

"We have high expectations for ourselves on offense," Prescott said. "We obviously want to score on every possession and they gave us some scoring chances late.

"No matter if we're up or down, we're going to go out there and score and I think we've shown that the last couple of weeks."

Prescott wasn't flashy throughout, but heated up when it mattered most in the fourth quarter. He has five rushing touchdowns, has thrown for 18 TDs and only been intercepted twice.

The Cowboys took a 17-6 lead into the fourth quarter and the Redskins scored two touchdowns. Each score was answered by Prescott leading two seven-play scoring drives.

Prescott capped the 75-yard drive with a six-yard TD run with 10:49 remaining. Rookie running back Ezekiel Elliott capped a 45-yard drive with a one-yard run with 6:29 left.

"Those guys are just really good football players," Dallas tight end Jason Witten said. "I don't think we really view them as rookies.

"The responsibilities that have been thrown on them, they've handled it well and they're executing at in a big way at critical times throughout games."

Franchise-tagged quarterback Kirk Cousins completed 41 passes for 449 yards and three touchdowns but the Redskins (6-4-1) could not come up with the magic to make a late push.

Washington didn't get its first touchdown until the start of the fourth quarter and the Cowboys defense didn't buckle in the final 6:29

Cousins connected with Jordan Reed on a five-yard TD six seconds into the fourth and pulled the Redskins within 24-19 on a 67-yard scoring strike to DeSean Jackson with 9:22 remaining.

"We pulled within striking distance a couple of times, but the way Dallas was able to come back and score says a lot of how good of a football team they have and why they're leading out division," Cousins said. "We know as an offense, that the job's the same and we need to put points on the board and manage it well.

The Redskins made one final push, pulling within five points on a eight-yard touchdown catch by Reed with 1:53 remaining in the game.

Read more

Frida Kahlo painting, unseen for 60 years, sells for $1.81 million

By Walker Simon | NEW YORK

NEW YORK Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's "Nina con Collar," an early painting whose whereabouts had been a mystery for 60 years, has sold for $1.81 million at a Sotheby's Latin American art auction.

Works by Mexican Rufino Tamayo and Colombia's Fernando Botero topped sales at the auction.

"We saw a series of exceptional prices for the giants of Latin American modern art," said Axel Stein, Sotheby’s Latin American art chief, commenting on the $16.84 million in total sales on Tuesday evening in New York.

Leading the sale was Tamayo's "Sandías y naranja" (Watermelons and orange), a 1957 oil and sand on canvas once owned by film star Audrey Hepburn, Sotheby's said. It sold for $2.29 million.

A Botero bronze sculpture, "Man on a Horse," fetched $1.82 million, and his "Homage to Bonnard," a large-scale nude painting, went for $1.39 million.

Kahlo's "Nina con Collar," (Girl with Necklace), which had not been seen publicly for six decades, went to an unidentified European buyer. The 1929 oil on canvas is among the first 20 of the Mexican artist's 143 paintings, Stein said.

The work, whose subject is about 13 or 14, prefigures hallmarks of Kahlo's self-portraits, including winged eyebrows and a full frontal gaze.

Kahlo died at age 47 in 1954. The following year, her widower, the muralist Diego Rivera, gave "Nina con Collar" to one of her studio assistants, who hung it in her California home for 60 years, according to Stein.

The work came to light when the unidentified former studio assistant, now in her mid-90s, contacted Sotheby's last summer, Stein said.

In international art markets, works by Kahlo have fetched more than any other Latin American artist, according to Stein.

Last May, Christie's sold a 1939 Kahlo painting for $8 million, an auction record for her work.

Sotheby's has privately sold Kahlo works for more than $15 million each, said Dan Abernethy, an auction house spokesman.

One reason Kahlo's works are so valued in the international market is that Mexico barred their export for several decades under laws to conserve the country's cultural heritage, Stein said.

(Editing by Daniel Wallis and Jeffrey Benkoe)

Read more

Frida Kahlo painting, unseen for 60 years, sells for $1.81 million

By Walker Simon | NEW YORK

NEW YORK Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's "Nina con Collar," an early painting whose whereabouts had been a mystery for 60 years, has sold for $1.81 million at a Sotheby's Latin American art auction.

Works by Mexican Rufino Tamayo and Colombia's Fernando Botero topped sales at the auction.

"We saw a series of exceptional prices for the giants of Latin American modern art," said Axel Stein, Sotheby’s Latin American art chief, commenting on the $16.84 million in total sales on Tuesday evening in New York.

Leading the sale was Tamayo's "Sandías y naranja" (Watermelons and orange), a 1957 oil and sand on canvas once owned by film star Audrey Hepburn, Sotheby's said. It sold for $2.29 million.

A Botero bronze sculpture, "Man on a Horse," fetched $1.82 million, and his "Homage to Bonnard," a large-scale nude painting, went for $1.39 million.

Kahlo's "Nina con Collar," (Girl with Necklace), which had not been seen publicly for six decades, went to an unidentified European buyer. The 1929 oil on canvas is among the first 20 of the Mexican artist's 143 paintings, Stein said.

The work, whose subject is about 13 or 14, prefigures hallmarks of Kahlo's self-portraits, including winged eyebrows and a full frontal gaze.

Kahlo died at age 47 in 1954. The following year, her widower, the muralist Diego Rivera, gave "Nina con Collar" to one of her studio assistants, who hung it in her California home for 60 years, according to Stein.

The work came to light when the unidentified former studio assistant, now in her mid-90s, contacted Sotheby's last summer, Stein said.

In international art markets, works by Kahlo have fetched more than any other Latin American artist, according to Stein.

Last May, Christie's sold a 1939 Kahlo painting for $8 million, an auction record for her work.

Sotheby's has privately sold Kahlo works for more than $15 million each, said Dan Abernethy, an auction house spokesman.

One reason Kahlo's works are so valued in the international market is that Mexico barred their export for several decades under laws to conserve the country's cultural heritage, Stein said.

(Editing by Daniel Wallis and Jeffrey Benkoe)

Read more

Beijing's scrap collectors swept up in latest crackdown on migrants

By Sue-Lin Wong | BEIJING

BEIJING Working in the shadow of Beijing's looming skyscrapers, Yin Xueqiang weighs a pile of cardboard and old shoe racks in a dusty scrapyard, the latest casualty of a crackdown on migrant workers in China's capital.

   Last week, security guards blocked the road Yin and fellow scrap collectors took to enter the yard. The authorities had posted signs this month giving the collectors ten days to leave.

    "The city government is trying to get us migrant workers to leave Beijing, they say there are too many of us and not enough space," said Yin, who hails from China's central province of Henan.

    As authorities try to rein in Beijing's growing population and capitalize on skyrocketing land prices, scrap collectors say they are being pushed out, despite playing a vital role in China's unique recycling ecosystem.

    Unlike many Western cities, where local authorities run recycling programs, in Beijing, entrepreneurial migrant workers drive a significant part of the effort.

They cycle around the city collecting cardboard, plastic and other scrap before selling it on to rubbish traders, who then resell it to factories as scrap.

    "Beijingers wouldn't be able to survive for even a day without us," Yin said, weighing piles of plastic on a rusty scale before handing a few dollars to a fellow collector, who pedaled away on a motorized tricycle.

    "Who is going to collect all the rubbish? Who is going to recycle it all? Do you think Beijingers would be willing to do this kind of work?" Yin said.

    Yin, whose efforts can bring in 3,000 to 5,000 yuan a month, has been in Beijing for more than 10 years. He moved to the scrap yard three years ago.

    Few of his friends from Henan are left in Beijing, as it gets harder to make a living in the expensive city. Yin said he is considering going home or moving to a scrapyard further away from the city center.

    A generation of young consumers has come of age in China lacking the recycling habits of parents and grandparents who suffered hardships before the economy began opening up in the late 1970s.

This absence of the impulse to recycle, along with astronomical economic growth, swift urbanization and surging consumption, led China to overtake the United States as the world’s largest generator of waste in 2004, the World Bank says.

    By 2025, China will produce around 1.4 million tons of waste every day, but as scrap collectors shift into other industries, whether voluntarily or after being compelled by the authorities, the country is burying or burning more waste.

    "Over the past few years, I've taken Americans, Japanese, visitors from several developed countries to scrapyards in Beijing and their reaction is – 'This recycling system is excellent, why isn't more being done to preserve it?'" said Chen Liwen, who has studied China's scrap collectors.

    Dong Dingxia, 50, who left her farm, accompanied by her husband, to collect wooden scrap in Beijing after her children departed for university, puzzled over the same question.

    "I don't understand why we're being kicked out. It won't be good if rubbish starts piling up around the city," she said, while stripping foam from old wooden chairs.

    "But I guess what I think doesn't matter."

(Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Read more

South African cave pebble outshines treasures at British Museum




LONDON In a corner of the British Museum's new South African exhibition, near an ancient golden rhino and a collection of apartheid-era campaign badges, sits a glass case holding a pitted, reddish-brown stone.

It is the Makapansgat pebble, on display for the first time in its three-million-year history, curators reckon - an object that, in its own way, outshines the other treasures in the museum's halls.


Experts theorize a very early ancestor of humans, Australopithecus africanus, picked up the pebble and took it home, mainly because it was interested in a pattern of lines on the surface that, even today, look startlingly like a face.


"This is an example of early curiosity, a pre-cursor to true art that some people have called the earliest piece of art of anywhere in the world, the earliest piece of found art," said John Giblin, co-curator of the show "South Africa: the Art of a Nation".


The naturally-formed pebble - also known as the stone of many faces - was found in Makapan valley in Limpopo province near some Australopithecus remains in the 1920s, several kilometers away from its likely source.




The theories have clustered around it since. It could be the earliest known sign of empathy - if the creature saw it as a baby. It could show the development of self-awareness - the stone forms a different face if you turn it the other way round, a face very much like an Australopithecus africanus.


It also has a claim to being the world's earliest known exhibit - in the sense of an object set aside for special contemplation - giving it an edge over the Elgin marbles one floor down in the British Museum, or the Egyptian mummies two floors up.




That is all theorizing. "It's impossible to ever really know what's behind the pebble and if these early australopiths recognized it as a representation of something that looked like them," said Bernhard Zipfel from the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Witwatersrand University in Johannesburg, which loaned the pebble.


But it is theorizing that has continued to compel experts in the field.




"When you are holding it and looking at that face and imagining how another being three million years ago saw a face in that - and you remember how you walked along a beach and picked up stones that looked like they had faces or other features in there - you see this really common experience," said Giblin.



(Reporting by Andrew Heavens; Editing by Toby Chopra)


Read more

Older PostNewer Post